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GRANTED

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We are not even half way into the first month of the new year and Project Snook is off to an amazing start. Just before New Year’s, Project Snook received some last minute donations that brought the year end figures to a staggering new grand total. Shortly after the ball dropped in the Big Apple, Mote Marine’s Center for Aquaculture Research and Development received a letter from the University of South Florida with very exciting news. December brings out the generosity in people and Project Snook graciously accepted charitable donations from industry partners. Dick’s Sporting Goods sent their second $5000 donation to back the project. TrueFlies, a new apparel company, showed their appreciation of Mote’s snook research with a $5000 donation as well. These newly acquired funds pushed the grand total to an overwhelming new high. Dr. Kevan Main, Center Director for Mote’s Aquaculture Park, reported this week that their proposal to University of South Florida has been selected to re

SNOOK RESEARCH GOES CORPORATE

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Addictive Fishing visits Mote Aquaculture Park (MAP) to officially kick off - Project Snook - to raise funding and public awareness for Mote Marine’s snook hatchery program. Kevan Main and Carole Neidig from MAP greeted a group of representatives from Addictive Fishing, MPI Productions, and Dick’s Sporting Goods to graciously accept donations that will keep the doors open and the pumps running. Mote was on the verge of closing their snook stock enhancement program due to financial cutbacks of today’s adjusting economy. The same day MAP held a meeting regarding the future of the program program, Kevin McCabe, producer of Addictive Fishing Television, had the idea to become a part of the snook research project. "The fish gods have been very, very good to me, my partner Capt. Blair Wiggins and Addictive Fishing, and now it's our turn to give back," Kevin explains.  Addictive Fishing Television is using their pull with sponsors to raise money for Project Snook.

STAR BRITE JOINS PROJECT SNOOK

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What if we could find a company who would create a special edition product and donate 100% of the proceeds to Mote's Snook Enhancement Program? That was the first task on the "to-do" list in order to get Project Snook moving, but without a flagship sponsor, it wouldn't get off the ground. Addictive Fishing Television has been one of the most popular saltwater fishing shows on television for the past 10 years, and Capt. Blair Wiggins brings the power of celebrity to Project Snook. "Being able to help preserve our fisheries, make sure it will be here for the next generation, and reach a mass audience with our television show is what it's all about," says Capt. Blair Wiggins. This year, Capt. Blair and the AF crew will be producing short news features on Mote's snook spawning process for their television show and internet viewers. This is a tremendous value for the program and will bring in much needed sponsors for Project Snook.  This is wher

THE SPAWN OF PROJECT SNOOK

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For ten years, Kevin McCabe, producer of Addictive Fishing Television, has been chasing the dream, producing one of the most popular saltwater fishing shows on television with his childhood friend Capt. Blair Wiggins, and doing what he loves for a living. The fish gods have been very, very good to Kevin, his partner Capt. Blair Wiggins and Addictive Fishing, and now it's their turn to give back. The winter of 2010 will go down in Florida's history as one of the deadliest killers of the common snook - one of Florida's treasured indigenous game fish. In January and February, news of the snook kill traveled instantaneously over the internet. Graphic pictures and eyewitness reports flooded websites, and Kevin was left with an indelible mark on his mind. "I've been waiting for a program to come along, one I could give back to the fishery that has provided so much for us over our lifetime. I just woke up one morning with a vision to use Addictive Fishing

SNOOKERING SNOOK

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Snook - prized by anglers for decades because of their acrobatic leaps on the end of a fishing line and their ability to evade capture more often than not - are one of the most important catches in Florida's saltwater recreational fishing industry. Their popularity, however, has a downside: fishing pressures have placed them on the state's list of "species of special concern" and resulted in the need for fishing restrictions and careful monitoring. "It's a very valuable species," said Dr. Kenneth Leber, Director of Mote's Center for Fisheries Enhancement. "The saltwater fishing industry brings $5.4 billion into the state's economy each year. And at the rate it's growing, we're going to need even stronger protection measures in the future." Right now, on Florida's west coast, anglers are allowed to keep one snook per day. "The angling population is going to double; what do you do? Reduce that to half a fish per day?&q